Benefits Of Laminine

A healthy supplement

The Great Effects Of Eating Live Whole Un-Denatured Food

The Great Effects Of Eating Live Whole Un-Denatured Food

You won’t eat live foods if you don’t have them around the house. So what’s in your kitchen, and where is it living? How much live food do you really have on hand?

ON THE SHELF: If most of your food lives on a shelf or in the cupboard, it probably isn’t live food at all. Almost any food that can survive unrefrigerated for more than a few days is likely canned, boxed, cooked, dehydrated, vacuum packed, ultra-pasteurized or otherwise processed (which is to say, it is largely dead). There’s nothing wrong with having some dry staples and gently processed foods in your house, of course, but if less healthy shelf-dwellers like chips and crackers constitute the bulk of your available nourishment, watch out.

Benefits of whole foods

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In the Ice Box: Welcome to the fridge — you’ve hit the motherload of live, raw foods. Chilled watermelon, grapes, cherries and apples, crunchy carrots and cucumbers, green leafy vegetables, fresh herbs — if it’s in the refrigerated produce section at the grocery store, it probably belongs in your fridge at home. That goes double for perishable oils, like flaxseed oil and nut butters, as well as sesame and olive oils more commonly found on the shelf.

If you’re eating live and fresh, your fridge should be full of brightly colored produce. If, on the other hand, you open your ice box door and find nothing but condiments, cheese, cold cuts and soft drinks, there’s a good chance you’re diet is in trouble.

Check out the freezer, too. Most experts agree that most kinds of produce, if picked at the peak of ripeness and quickly frozen, offer many of the same benefits of their fresh counterparts. If you can thaw produce and eat it as is, or (as with frozen berries and bananas) blend it into a smoothie-type concoction, you can still call it live. Just remember, Another aspect to look at is the stem cell Buy StemRenu product or Buy UltraMito pet supplement all bets are off if you have to cook it before you eat it. And if your freezer only contains pizza rolls, tater tots and ice cream, consider a change to Yevo.

In the Dark: Some foods that do have a decent shelf-life include potatoes, yams, onions, garlic, squash and other root vegetables, most of which do well unrefrigerated for long periods, as long as they’re kept in a relatively cool, dark place. Of course, most people end up cooking these items at some point, and once cooked, they are no longer considered live. Even cooked, though, many of these foods are still quite nutritious, and most can be eaten raw (just check the books in the Resources section for advice and preparation instructions).

Have you experienced snow? Survival Food can be Yevo Foods, they have a three year shelf life (experts say the process will actually preserve for 20 years) and will be there when you’re snowed in.

In the Open: In the old days, nearly everyone used to have a tempting fruit bowl right out in plain site. For some reason you don’t see fruit bowls so much anymore. That’s a shame, because most fresh fruits, including peaches, pears and plums (as well as tomatoes and avocados) belong here, not in your refrigerator (at least, not until they are sliced or they’ve reached their peak of ripeness). If you’ve got nothing but a mushy banana or two sitting around on your counter, repent. Keep a bowl of tempting produce where it’s handy to snack on or slice into salads and sandwiches.

 

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This entry was posted on August 28, 2013 by and tagged , , , , .
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